Consistency, commitment key to fitness-related New Year’s resolutions

Metro Creative

It may only be the first week of December, but it’s never too early to think about that New Year’s resolution to get fit in 2020.

While a commitment to fitness is often one of the most popular resolutions, it can also be one of the easiest to let fall by the wayside as schedules get busy after the holidays.

While making the commitment to staying active and making healthier choices can be challenging, Veronica Garza, Manager of the Valley Baptist Health & Fitness Center, said there are steps we can all take over the course of the holiday season and beyond to give health-related New Year’s resolutions the greatest odds of success.

“It’s important to find something you like and something know you’re going to stick with. If you start a class or an activity that you just don’t enjoy, you’re not going to want to continue to do it. That is unique to everyone, and you need to find something that works for you and do your best,” Garza said. “Start two to three times a week, especially now. Don’t wait until after the holidays. If you want to lead a healthier lifestyle, start moving. There is so much sitting in our lives now, but there are so many things you can do at home to get ready for making that resolution a success.”

Planning while keeping long-term goals in mind can be a major challenge when it comes to a successful healthy New Year’s resolution. All too often, Garza said she sees too many new clients trying to do too much, too soon.

“People start so strong. They come in and they want to give 110 percent. We see it all the time, especially in January. They want to work hard and they want to make changes, so they come in seven days a week and they’re here for three hours,” she said. “They completely stop eating certain meals and that’s where we see people not staying with their resolution. They want to make a change that is temporary and fast, but what we preach all the time is a lifestyle change. This is something you’re doing for the rest of your life.”

For those looking to join a gym as part of their New Year’s resolution to fitness, Garza said her staff of 30 employees at the Valley Baptist Health & Fitness Center – the majority of which are fitness course instructors and personal trainers – is committed to helping others reach their exercise goals.

The 38,000-square-foot fitness center includes men’s and women’s locker rooms, sauna, heated pool, multiple spacious exercise and weight machine and equipment rooms, and more, is located at 3100 N. Augusta National Drive in Harlingen. Fitness center hours are 4:45 a.m. – 10 p.m. Monday through Friday, and 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

Perhaps most important, Garza said, is the feeling of community and togetherness that is encouraged by the facility’s members and training staff.

“A lot of people need the extra motivation of a group setting. We encourage people to come in and try a class, because it’s a whole group working together and encouraging each other. It’s a team and we really work to build relationships,” she said. “We tell people, just make the commitment to come in the door. Once you’re through those doors, we’ve got you. We’re here to help you reach your goals. We build relationships with our clients – we push them, we inspire and motivate them, and we love what we do here.”

For more information on the services offered by the Valley Baptist Health & Fitness Center, contact Manager Veronica Garza at (956) 230-1245​.

 

  • Get moving – Whether it’s going for a simple walk or completing a regular chore like mowing the grass, routinely engaging in light exercise can help reduce the shock of starting a new exercise routine in January.
  • Find something you enjoy – Before starting your exercise routine, do some research and find an activity you enjoy. Enjoying your fitness routine can be the first step to a successful commitment.
  • Don’t over-do it – One of the biggest mistakes when it comes to the New Year’s resolution to fitness can be trying to do too much too fast. Set goals that are obtainable and schedules that are sustainable. Remember, committing to fitness is a lifetime goal – it’s a marathon, not a sprint!
  • Diet is key – Diet is important to meeting your fitness goals, but again, don’t over-do it. Cutting yourself off entirely from your favorite foods is not necessarily a recipe for success.