Major job fair, Go Hire Harlingen, slated for April

HARLINGEN — In what organizers say will be the biggest job fair the city has seen in six years, Workforce Solutions Cameron is seeking employers to participate in “Go Hire Harlingen.”

The job fair will be held April 16 at the Harlingen Convention Center, and Workforce Solutions Cameron and its sponsoring partner, the Harlingen Economic Development Corp., are planning on 30 employers at the event who will be holding onsite job interviews.

Employers from Harlingen and elsewhere in Cameron County are expected to range from health care, call and data centers, manufacturing, transportation, education and government sectors.

Employers pay no fee but will have to register since space is limited. They can do so by calling Workforce Solutions Cameron at 956-368-5200 ext. 4328 or by signing up online at the agency’s website, www.wfscameron.org/

“HEDC continues to develop great relationships with agencies such as Workforce Solutions to help showcase the talent pool available here in Harlingen,” said Mickey Boland, HEDC board chair.

Raudel Garza, chief executive of the HEDC, said while the jobless rate in Harlingen has been relatively low, it doesn’t mean job-seekers are not out looking.

“The unemployment rate in Harlingen has maintained right under 5 percent and that’s great, that means people are working,” Garza said.

“But there are still over 1,100 individuals in Harlingen and over 9,500 people in Cameron County as a whole seeking employment or considering a career change, and Go Hire Harlingen is the perfect event to help those people,” he added.

The job fair may be coming at an opportune time. After a year of drops, the last jobless numbers showed the Brownsville-Harlingen Metropolitan Statistical Area rising from 5.4 percent in November to 5.8 percent in December.

The latter is the same number recorded in December 2018.

Statewide, the Texas jobless rate for December also ticked back up, rising to 3.5 percent from 3.4 percent, although that number is still near the state’s historical low.