Cameron, Hidalgo lose 41,800 jobs in April

HARLINGEN — Cameron and Hidalgo counties lost about 41,800 jobs last month, driving their unemployment rates to about 17 percent — the highest in...

Photo Gallery: Vandalism at religious institutions

Graffiti is seen outside the Shri Nanak Center Hindu temple in Edinburg Tuesday. The San Juan basilica and the Temple Emmanuel synagogue in McAllen...

Cities critical of Hidalgo Co.’s distribution of COVID-19 relief funds

Tension between Hidalgo County and its municipalities reached a boiling point after elected officials in several cities expressed disappointment at how the county distributed a portion of the $151 million it received in coronavirus relief funds. Last week, Hidalgo County commissioners voted to share $63 million — or nearly 42% of the money it received directly from the federal government in April — with cities on a reimbursement basis for their COVID-19 related expenses. After that allocation, Hidalgo County was left with $88 million to spend on rural residents and other public health purposes. The issue is, municipal officials don’t think county commissioners were fair in their funding formula, which capped the reimbursement rates for large cities at $110 per capita and small cities at $80 per head — all based on a population mark above or below 30,000. Read the full story at themonitor.com

Rio Hondo man charged in death of teen; police ID victim

A 20-year-old Rio Hondo man is charged with murder in the death of a 15-year-old Harlingen girl whose body was left on the side...

Report shines light into deadly day in Edinburg

Aaron Cortez made the right decision. When the registered nurse and Army reservist noticed that 19-year-old Rebecca Lee Cantu's toddler looked a lot like her stepfather, 58-year-old Saul Ramon Avila, he began asking questions. Rebecca resisted at first, but eventually the young woman confided in the 30-year-old: Avila had been sexually abusing her since she was 14. Not only did her mother, 48-year-old Magdalena Cantu, know about it, Rebecca told Aaron, she was complicit in the abuse. Read the full story at themonitor.com

Interest in cycling shifts upward as RGV stays home

When coronavirus restrictions were at their most stringent, roads emptied — along with restaurants, gyms and most other places people congregate. What stayed open, though, were sidewalks, where walkers, joggers and cyclists hit the trail in numbers some Rio Grande Valley municipalities describe as unprecedented. Representatives from the city of Mission say they lack a way to measure the increase, but they have seen a dramatic uptick in the number of residents using parks like the Mission Hike and Bike Trail. “It used to be (just) the bike clubs, competitive cyclists out there,” Recreation Director Brad Bentsen said of the five-mile route. “Now it has gone back to the old family ways. You can just go out there and observe how many people are using our bike trails — it’s all day, every day.” Read the full story at themonitor.com

HCISD seniors to graduate in virtual time

HARLINGEN — Tonight’s the night. The students at Early College High School have worked hard these many years to reach tonight’s event, graduation. But they...

Texas sees deadliest COVID-19 day so far with 58 deaths

DALLAS (AP) — Texas saw its deadliest COVID-19 day of the coronavirus pandemic so far, with state officials reporting 58 deaths during a time...

Warriors’ Ruiz a savvy defender

HARLINGEN — Santa Rosa quarterback Jose Ruiz has had a knack for identifying coverages and anticipating movement of defensive players. So doing the reverse as...